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Civic Projects   arrow

Family and community leaders identify and address community issues and
opportunities for system change through their civic projects.

Image 2016 Community Project Report

Click here to read about the projects our family leaders implemented in the 2016 Community Project Report.

An important part of participation in an FLTI class is the development of a civic project. All family leaders in FLTI must implement a civic project in order to graduate. The project gives grounding to the 20 classes in empirical hands-on learning. Civic projects are a reflection of participants’ passion and targeted questions and goals. Projects do not need to be a new program, as joining or enhancing an existing effort is also encouraged.

Facilitators and site coordinators must pay careful attention to both the hopes and the practicality of the projects.

  • What is the learning goal?
  • How does it align with class objectives and learnings?

This FLTI practice uses adult learning theory to assure that learning objectives are tested weekly.

Family Leadership civic project

A family leader presents her civic project at FLTI of Summit County’s 2017 graduation.

The local team helps assure that the projects relate to civic skills, (rather than creating a new agency). They pay careful attention to purpose, learning opportunity, collective impact, the group process, and to the individual learner.

Participants address a variety of community issues and system change needs.

Past Projects:

Examples of civic projects that show the range of unmet needs for their children and community include:

  • A grandparent raising her grandchild starts a support group for local grandparents to get support, training, and resources.
  • Work to increase Latino participation in leadership positions in Lake County, because the Latino community is underrepresented.
  • A program that provides students with transportation afterschool if they want to attend the free tutoring classes the school district provides.
  • A community campaign to end the use of the “R” word, so that people with disabilities feel respected and honored.
  • An education campaign to increase the use of safety belts in the Latino community, because many Mexican immigrants do not learn about the need for seatbelt use, especially on highways.
  • A neighborhood coalition to create a playground for the participant’s neighborhood where the owners of the trailer park removed the previous park.
  • Creation of an online civic tool for families to bring families to the local civic table to create a better community.
  • Zumba exercise classes that target getting families in the mountains to increase physical activity during winter months.

 

Family Leadership civic project

Future facilitators in training.